Dietary Polyphenols Can Help Manage BPH, but Can’t Replace Existing Therapies

Dietary Polyphenols Can Help Manage BPH, but Can’t Replace Existing Therapies

According to a review study published in Frontiers in Pharmacology, dietary plant-based molecules that possess antioxidant properties called polyphenols can aid in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

However, these compounds cannot replace the need for existing therapies, surgical or pharmacological, as an effective treatment of this condition.

So far, science has not been able to uncover the full extent of the molecular mechanism involved in the development of BPH. Still, several factors such as inflammation mediators, hormones, oxidative stress, and dietary and environmental factors have been implicated in the development of BPH.

Standard care for these patients is currently based in α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists and 5α-reductase inhibitors drugs, and surgery. Despite the benefits of all these strategies, many serious side effects and complications have been associated with them. Researches are seeking alternative methods to tackle BPH.

Polyphenols are the most abundant natural antioxidants found in many elements of the common diet. In fruits, vegetables, seeds, nuts, chocolate, wine, coffee, and tea, polyphenols have gained scientific interest due to their strong antioxidant activity and their emerging role in the prevention of several diseases in which reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important participants.

The authors of the study titled, “Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Could Dietary Polyphenols Be an Alternative to Existing Therapies?” performed a literature review with resources to several databases, such as PubMed, Medline, Agora, and Hinari, to identify the current knowledge on the contribution of polyphenols to the management of BPH.

Culture dish studies have shown that dietary polyphenols can have 5α-reductase inhibitory properties, which make them promising agents for the management of BPH. But those experiments have never been tested in animal models.

However, preclinical animal studies have reported that dietary polyphenols have the potential to suppress BPH.

Despite these potential benefits, the concept of these dietary agents to manage BPH has been under debate, due mainly to contradictory results from clinical studies. Adding to this, nonregulated and long-lasting exposure to some polyphenols was found to induce potentially harmful adverse side effects.

“While this review does not state emphatically that dietary polyphenols could replace the need for the existing therapies in the management of BPH,” it suggests their potential as an area for additional exploration, researchers wrote.

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May 24, 2017
According to a review study published in Frontiers in Pharmacology, dietary plant-based molecules that possess antioxidant properties called polyphenols can aid in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, these compounds cannot replace the need for existing therapies, surgical or pharmacological, as an effective treatment of this condition. So far, science has not been able to […] The post Dietary Polyphenols Can Help Manage BPH, but Can’t Replace Existing Therapies appeared first on BPH News.
May 17, 2017
  Five-year results of the Phase 3 LIFT trial evaluating the safety and effectiveness of NeoTract’s UroLift System as a treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) showed stable, long-term relief. Claus Roehrborn, MD, professor and chair of the Department of Urology at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, […] The post UroLift Shows Long-term Benefits for Treatment of LUTS, Study Says appeared first on BPH News.
Apr 3, 2017
Older men who perform pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) can get the same benefits as taking drugs for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), suggests a Dutch study appearing in the International Journal of Urology. The study, “Pelvic floor muscle therapy or alpha-blocking agents for treatment of men with lower urinary tract symptoms: An exploratory randomized controlled trial,” was […] The post Pelvis Muscle Therapy Just as Good as Alpha-Blocking Agents for Older Men with LUTS, Study Suggests appeared first on BPH News.
Nov 4, 2016
A retrospective study shows that a new surgical transurethral split of the prostate (TUSP) approach delivered promising long-term benefits for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia-induced lower urinary tract obstructions. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition marked by an enlarged prostate. It can lead to urinary tract obstruction and reduce patient quality of life. For […] The post Surgical TUSP Induces Long-Term Beneficial Effects for Certain BPH Patients appeared first on BPH News.

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